Some more arrow squid (14-Jan-2016)

Given the success of the previous day. Took the squid jig back out to and scored the bigger sized arrow squid. You can tell they are arrows by the flaps only going up to the middle of the body, hence looking like an arrow. The bigger relative the south calamari have flaps that go up to the head and large green eyes. They are quite hard to come by though.

School of squid and a leather jacket (13-Jan-2016)

So another scorcher in the Sydney summer. The warm weather must have brought about the squid as well! It was firing from the get-go as we managed a school of about 10 squid one after another and a consolation leather jacket! They are delicious pan-fried, but quite cumbersome to prepare. The skin is quite hard to strip and quite rough like leather, hence the name. You generally do not target leather jacket, but if they’re on, they are usually just under your feet! You will need a small hook as their mouths are very small.

Big Australian Salmon (01-Dec-2015)

So the start of summer, and still plenty of activity on the surface to suggest some big specimens around. I put in some live bait for most of the day without success. Towards the end of the day, I hooked up to a beast of a fight, but much unlike the typical fight of a kingfish, so my guess was either a salmon or a bonito. After a short fight, I pull up this beast of an Australian Salmon towards the 70cm and 3kg mark!

Monster King (27-Nov-2015)

The weather was starting to warm up for the upcoming summer and the warmer waters were definitely attracting the bigger species. The thrashing of water was a sign of the pelagics chasing the baitfish, most likely Salmon and Bonito. We put in a live yellowtail and after a short 10-20 minute wait, the line started peeling off the reel! I fortunately had a 4000 Daiwa with 20lb braid which was more than enough line to keep it occupied, although I was more worried about the nearby anchors that always seems to prove my undoing. After a vicious 20 minute fight, we brought up this beauty at a touch under 80cm

Rat Kingfish (21-Jan-2015)

Couldn’t quite get our hands on any live bait, so we threw in some cut up bait in hope for some bumper bream. We instead hooked on to a rat king! (slang for the smaller specimens) at the 45-50cm mark. You might be able to make out the circle hook that is still on the corner of its mouth. The brilliant thing about the way circle hooks are designed is that it does least possible damage to the fish yet it doesn’t seem to lessen the strike rate. You need to be a bit more patient with the circle hooks though, as they are designed for the fish to swallow completely and they’ll hook themselves on.